fbpx Would you think this kettle was made in the UK? - Make it British

Would you think this kettle was made in the UK?

dualit toaster made in the UK

Would you think this kettle was made in the UK?

When I surveyed our followers on Instagram with this image over 30% of them thought that this kettle was made in the UK. So if you did too, you’re not alone.

Brands often use terms like ‘designed in the UK‘, ‘developed in the UK‘ or in this case, ‘engineered in the UK‘ to give the impression that you are buying a product that is manufactured in the UK.

These phrases are often accompanied by the good old Union Jack flag 🇬🇧

It’s an ongoing problem, and something that I call Fake it British!

Previous examples that I have uncovered can be seen herehere and here, but there are many more that I’ve not even documented.

Because it has been proven that many consumers actively seek out products which are made in the UK, there is a great value in promoting something as ‘British’. But if labelling and packaging is not clear, shoppers could end up finding themselves with a purchase which is not all that they first thought.

I couldn’t find a ‘made in’ label anywhere on this Dualit kettle but there was a Dualit toaster sitting alongside the kettle in store and that was proudly announcing that it was Handmade in the U.K. so why not use the same message for the kettle?

dualit toaster made in the UK

The Dualit toaster made in the UK that was sitting alongside the kettle in the store

I’m still waiting for Dualit to get back to me to confirm the kettle’s country of origin.

I’ve no doubt that both kettle and toaster are quality products, but if the kettle isn’t made in the UK it is a real shame that Dualit had to resort to this. The fake it British marketing detracts from their fantastic toasters which ARE made in Britain.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this, or examples of any products that you have seen in stores that use misleading marketing to dupe consumers into thinking they are buying a made in the UK product.

Please leave your comments below or join in the conversation on social media using the hashtag #fakeitbritish

Comments

  1. William Hall on September 27, 2018 at 12:09 pm

    It will be a long wait for any reply from this company, when I questioned them sometime ago regarding their Kettles origins, they were very evasive on the issue, the only product they produce in Britain are the toasters, everything else although displaying a Union Jack was being sourced from”Overseas”

    • Dawn Hicks on September 19, 2019 at 6:05 pm

      We had a dualit kettle, paying nearly a hundred pounds for it believing it to be made in the UK, however my father called them and they reluctantly admitted that it was made in……. wait for it CHINA….. hohoho what a surprise.

  2. Claire Leavey on September 27, 2018 at 12:11 pm

    I stopped buying Dualit after being told a stick blender with a burnt-out motor couldn’t be repaired. The whole reason I liked their products was sturdy British engineering and the fact that they claimed to offer a repair service. Turns out that was all fibs too, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that blender was Chinese. It was lighter than expected, all fake-chromed plastic, and plainly far too feeble for the price. I could have bought five less swanky brands for the price of that one, and would have had five times the use out of them. That’s the opposite of the way a premium ‘British’ line is supposed to work.

  3. Tim Crawford on September 27, 2018 at 6:52 pm

    I bought a Dualit kettle in 2013 and I asked them where it was made. They e-mailed me back, telling me it was made in China.
    “Some of our products are manufactured in China, the kettles, blenders and food processors, for example.”

  4. Claire on September 28, 2018 at 12:04 pm

    Yes – this!!!!!
    Absolutely makes my blood boil that we have all these things “proudly designed/thought up/imagined in Britain”….. only to be shipped off to anywhere cheap to be made.
    I refuse to buy any makeup that is made in China (unless it sneaks through without me noticing – very, very rare). But Collection 2000 are guilty of it all the time, (along with the designed in Britain nonsense) and you will notice often that Boots Christmas items are suddenly not made in Britain but in China/Thailand – think Soap and Glory – mascara/lipgloss in sets are Chinese, yet usually made here, slipped in with the rest of the British made items.
    I’ve also noticed that White Company’s scented diffusers have now been shipped to China (and the scent payoff has gone with it).
    Sorry, could rant on this one for days!

  5. Barbara jarvie on December 28, 2018 at 2:34 pm

    Yes, I have bought this exact kettle and matching toaster, saved for ages as it is quite pricey, but do want to support British high standards, quality, industries and jobs. This would be very disappointing to find the British flag (or any flag from the union as I live in Scotland) ended up to be fake insignificance. This would be, very misleading indeed as I deliberately spent more money to supposedly buy British!
    Barbara

  6. Dave Stacey on December 28, 2018 at 4:37 pm

    A simple rule of thumb is, unless any product actually say ‘ Made (or produced) in the UK’ then it is NOT made in the UK.
    What annoys me over the last few years is that most items made in the UK are labelled ‘Made in the EU’, while items from Germany proudly state Made in Germany as with France, Italy etc, which, (don’t get me wrong ) i also like to purchase good quality German or french goods, if there is not a British alternative.

  7. Gail Holt on January 2, 2019 at 3:25 pm

    I wouldn’t believe anything is made in the UK unless I specifically see the words “Made in the UK”. Sad but true. Several months back I bought a Fogarty mattress protector and was fooled by the fact it said on the packaging “The British Allergy Foundation Seal of Approval”. Inside on the label, after I washed the product I noticed it said “made in China”! Very frustrating. Another reason I thought the mattress protector was British made is that they do clearly mark duvets as being made in the UK. On another occasion I noticed Clarks Shoes advertising in big bold letters inside one of their stores “Quintessentially British”. When I asked the sales assistant if they actually had any British made shoes they were unsure and he asked the manager of the store who replied “no”!! I just keep looking and keep checking for British made goods, and the Make it British website has helped a lot in finding British manufacturers too – thank you!

  8. john on March 27, 2019 at 11:43 pm

    I have just stopped using my fourth Russell Hobbs Electric Kettle as the same severe what appears to be greenish black
    corrosion to the inside (supposedly Stainless Steel) base of the water tank of the kettle has got to such a degree and we believe it (may have something to do with us both having developed long term coughs or not,under further investigation).
    We have both tried to clean this with only plastic scouring pads with just warm water and no soap or cleaning products
    to no avail.we tried this on previous same make similar models with no success and went on to purchase successive models until we have given up !no more Russell Hobbs Kettles ! I have used as my parents used Russell ,the last good one
    was one of the last models to be Made in Britain,apparently this logo doesn’t have the same credibility as it had when they and most other domestic,industrial, engineering,electrical,technological,scientific instruments,aircraft,shipbuilding ,equipment and other key components and inventions were designed Made and Manufactured in The United Kingdom of Great Britain.
    What a sad indictment of the lack foresight by major investors allowed to control “OUR” industries has come to now by short term political commercial and industrial decisions will affect us by having to rely on this repetitive manufacture
    of poorly designed and constructed products that has no suggestion in its design or manufacture of recyclability or the the possibility or ease of repair.this has now come back to affect what has become part of British Culture, What used to be a healthy (before the potential effects of the corrosive metal in the bottom of the kettles above) British Cup of Tea.I have a friend that bought her kettle from the same well known supplier at about the same time and so I asked her to look in her to look into her kettle and let me know what she had found .It was in a similar condition in the same place.she told me that is why she replace the last Russell Hobbs kettle .
    I have now resorted to boiling water in a saucepan after a visit to the original supplier where I showed the manager how this kettle had corroded and he advised me t “o scour it with white vinegar” ! I reminded him of the corrosive acetic acid he said” as long as you wash it out after a few minutes it should be ok ” I asked him if he could show me a quality kettle that is manufactured WITH A MADE IN BRITAIN LABEL ,AFTER ABOUT TEN KETTLES TURNED UPSIDE Down to reveal labels repeatedly saying made in China shouted across the shop” I’ve found one here made in PRC ! WHERE’S THAT ?
    I told him I that it was very very similar to China and the people there spoke the same languages and produced the similar products ,had similar features and landscapes,even the coastline looked similar ,he appeared to be listening with interest until He said he had suddenly remembered a kettle made in Italy, a Dilonghy ! We thank him for his help and
    left in dissapointment .On reaching home I set about a web search for a supplier of British Made Electric Kettles,whilst
    drinking a cup of tea made from water boiled in a Sheffield Stainless Steel Saucepan !

  9. George Beattie on June 25, 2019 at 7:37 am

    I too bought a kettle on the understanding that this was a UK manufacturer. The only clue, and I did not spot it until after I had unpacked and used this kettle was a label placed by Lakeland saying China. I studied every other piece of packaging and could find no mention of this product being made in China. I fact the clear inference was that it was made in the UK.
    John Lewis and Lakeland are major outlets for this firm and I am surprised they allow Dualit to behave in this way. If Dualit have no shame in this then may be the retailers need to be far more up front (yes Lakeland’s label does say China).

  10. Nick Brownjohn on August 22, 2019 at 9:14 pm

    I’m an Ex-Pat Brit returning to the UK for my summer hols and wondered what the economic status is so I had a look around and I was shocked.

    I couldn’t hire a British car at the Airport….there aren’t any. The vast majority were either fully foreign or made in the UK by companies in the control of foreign owners. The journey from Heathrow to the midlands confirmed this once again; I saw just two truly British cars on the whole journey: an Austin Mini and a Morris Minor Woody, both from the 1960s, that was it!

    I went shopping and the picture became worse. In the 1990s my Denby tableware was made in England (I still have it to this day) but now they have pots and pans mostly made in China instead of made in Britain using steel from Sheffield.

    The Jaeger suits that I purchased in the ‘90s were also made in England, these too are now made in China.

    I went into a Clarks shoe shop and asked for Dessert Boots (they invented them). Firstly, the store assistant didn’t know what I was asking for and finally answered “no, don’t have them, but we do have lots of other stuff” … all made outside the UK.

    I went into WH Smiths and saw their London Jotter Parker pen, proudly displaying two Royal Warrants and a stylised Union flag on the packaging. My old Parker 45 pen was made in England so I guessed it must be British or probably like most things in Britain these days made in China. No totally wrong; it was made in FRANCE?!?!!!, Really? That isn’t a low Labour cost economy. Why on earth couldn’t that be made in the UK? The only British things I found in “Smiths” were a cardboard box file and some card file dividers.

    Feeling exceedingly depressed and angry I started to investigate more widely and the picture became even bleaker.

    Now it is time to take a long hard look at our nation and ask what has become of it. Here is a little experiment for you. Go into Google Maps, zoom in on any random street in the UK and use Street View to take a look at the vehicles on the road there. You will surely discover that more than 90% of those vehicles are foreign, the majority being German, Japanese, French or American with a smattering of others. It is almost impossible to find a street in Britain with a British vehicle on it manufactured in Britain by a British-owned company. A note for clarity; Vauxhall is owned by Peugeot so it is French. Minis, Rolls
    Royces and Bentleys are all German owned and Jaguar Land Rover is Indian (Tata Group) or German if you look at who the CEO and COO are and where important things like gear-boxes come from. The top seller in the UK is the “Made in Germany” Ford Fiesta, the second being the VW Golf.

    When was the last time you saw a 100% British built/British owned commercial vehicle on our roads? Go on name even one U.K. based, British owned HGV manufacturer? Why did such a core means of production and distribution slip into foreign hands? Germany, France, Japan and the USA have not divested these capabilities.

    Have you seen any British tyres lately?

    Now do the same exercise for streets in Germany (mostly German), France (mostly French), Italy (mostly Italian) America (mostly US) and Japan (well you know the story).

    Take a deep look into our economy and you will discover that huge swaths of once British products are now in foreign hands.

    I was surprised to discover that there are no longer any British owned ball-bearing manufacturers. Such a strategic industry as bearing manufacture in UK, no longer under British control?

    I thought I was being patriotic buying a super Brooke’s saddle for my bike. It seems I was mislead. In 2002 John Godfrey MacNaughtan and Adrien Williams sold Brooke’s saddles to Selle Royale in Italy. Well at least the tubing used in the frame is British.

    How about Kenwood; that most successful British food processor manufacturer? The company was founded by Kenneth Wood in 1947 in the town of Woking and moved to Havant in Hampshire in 1962 where it remains to this day (80 employees). So about as British as it gets right? Wrong! In 2001 the Italian De’Longhi company bought Kenwood and its factory in China (750 employees) for £45.9 million. It wasn’t flogged off by its founder because he died in 1997. It was sold by Colin Gordon, Kenwood’s chief executive, with the aid of Deutsche Bank.

    We can repeat the process for almost any aspect of British life.

    Here’s a personal hygiene example. Men’s electrical shavers/ Men’s razors
    Wilkinson Sword: was founded in London in 1772, but through successive take-overs ended up as an American owned company, but the Wilkinson Sword-branded three-, four-, and five-bladed razors for men and women have been produced in Germany since 1998, when production moved from the UK.

    A third of the milk drunk in Britain is supplied by foreign companies: Wiseman Milk is now part of the German group Müller, which bought it in 2012.

    There didn’t seem to be much point going to Boots: Walgreens, the biggest pharmacy company in the world, bought it for £5.65 billion ($9 billion). House of Fraser is owned by the Sanpower Group, a Chinese corporation that bought it for £450 million ($716 million). Before that it was owned by the Icelandic group Baugur.

    Heathrow Airport (and six other UK airports) are owned by foreigners: a consortium of international investors, lead by the Spanish Grupo Ferrovial, has controlled them since 2006.

    TfL is controlled by the Greater London Authority, but its famous red double-deckers operate through international partners. The biggest, Arriva, is a subsidiary of Deutsche Bahn, the German national railway, since 2010…..well they should at least run on time.

    Hamley’s was also owned by Baugur, before being sold to the French Ludendo Groupe for £60 million.

    ASDA is actually a Wal-Mart subsidiary since 1999. The American giant bought it for £6.7 billion.

    Umbro has passed from one foreign corporation to another: The US’s Iconix Brand Group took it from Nike in 2012.

    Sport has descended into “my teams foreign players/managers are better than your foreigners”.

    Mobile networks are not exempt: O2 was bought by Telefònica, a Spanish group, in 2005. EE is the largest mobile network in Britain. It is a joint venture between Deutsche Telekom and Orange SA. Orange used to be a British company, before it was bought by France Telecom in 2000.

    Energy and other Utilities: Scottish Power has been controlled by the Spanish multi-utility Iberdrola since 2006. Many British utilities are actually owned abroad. nPower, for example, was bought by the German provider RWE in 2002. So is Thames Water, which is controlled by the Macquarie Group of Australia, since 2006. Another is the Northumbrian Water Group, which has been bought by Chung Kong Infrastructure in 2011.

    Who sold so much of British business to the rest of the world? Someone certainly did very nicely out of all those multi-million/billion dollar deals.

    You can drill down into almost any aspect of British business history and discover that same story of political incompetence linked to corporate board-room short-term greed and
    mismanagement.

  11. Tam Gilchrist on September 16, 2019 at 10:53 pm

    Greedy and incompetent bar stewards

Leave a Comment





This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Weekly Newsletter

Click here to subscribe

Blog Categories

Advertise Here

Search the Site

Follow Us